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3790 Hwy 395 S. #407, Carson City, NV
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COVID-19 Office Updates

Per CDC guidelines and NV Emergency Directive 45, fully vaccinated (two weeks after your final shot) individuals do not need to wear a mask when visiting our office. If you aren’t considered fully vaccinated, we ask that you please wear a mask inside the office to protect yourself and others.

We continue to ask that you please call us at (775) 267-2012 when you arrive for your appointment and remain in your vehicle. We will ask you a few questions and then let you know when we are ready to have you come into the office. We hope that these measures will both streamline the process and ensure everyone’s safety.

All surfaces are disinfected between patients, as are all eyeglasses frames.

If you need to reorder contact lenses, click here to reorder without needing to visit our office!

 

How Dr. Farnaz Khankhanian Saved My Daughter’s Life

Hello,
 
I want to share my daughter's story on how she was diagnosed with her cancerous brain tumor.
 
My Daughter Savannah was just a day shy of ending the 3rd grade – June 8, 2010.
I was at work and I got a call from the school nurse saying that my daughters eye had crossed and she was having a hard time seeing. She also said it wasn't an emergency and Savannah would be fine to continue her day at school but to make her an eye appointment as Savannah might need to start wearing glasses.
 
Immediately, I got on the phone and was trying to make my daughter an eye exam appointment. The first place I called said they couldn't get her in for about a month. The second Place I called said they could fit her in the next day.
 
My daughter came home from school and said her head hurt and her eye had all of a sudden just went in towards her nose. My heart sank, and deep down I knew something wasn't right. Savannah's eye would go straight and move on its own.
 
I sent Savannah to her last day of 3rd grade. I got a call shortly after dropping her off that Savannah's appointment was cancelled due to double booking and they could reschedule for next week.  Next week wouldn't work for me something wasn't right.  I looked online and came across Eagle Vision and called them and they were able to get her in the same day.
 
It was an early release day at school. I picked Savannah up from the bus stop and headed straight to Eagle Vision's office. I was afraid because Savannah was uninsured and I had to make sure I could afford the eye exam. The girls were very friendly and gave me a set price that I was going to pay when I left.
 
Shortly after she got to meet Dr. Farnaz Khankhanian. She looked at Savannah's eyes and then dilated them and looked further.  Some more tests were done and she finally asked me to go into her office and showed me what Savannah's nerves looked like behind her eye and said something more is going on and you need to get her to the ER sooner rather than later.
 
I was sick with freight. I couldn't afford an ER visit.  After all the tests she did on Savannah I knew I couldn't afford that either.  I wish that was my only worry. Farnaz somehow knew what I was thinking and told me not to worry about paying them right then.  Savannah needed an MRI and I explained that we are uninsured so she wrote a prescription for an emergency MRI.  Farnaz hugged Savannah and then me and said Good luck!
 
I saw that look in her eyes, without words…that this was serious.  I called my husband and told him we were on our way to the ER and that Savannah needed an MRI. He was leaving Dayton and was on his way to meet us there.
 
I hit every red light. I couldn't talk and I was sick and weak all at once. Savannah calmly said "Am I going to die?”
 
Before she was able to say another word, I told her whatever happens we are in this together…what happens to her will also happen to me and that I will never leave her side.  I told her not to be afraid and that I will not let her die. I promised her that. The fear in her eyes relaxed.
 
We finally made it to the ER. We held hands not knowing in just a few more minutes our lives were about to forever change.
 
My husband made it just in time for the MRI, we looked at each other scared to death. I was able to sit with Savannah during the MRI. I held her hand and prayed silently to God not to take my baby away from me.
 
Soon after the MRI, the doctor came in and said Savannah had a very large brain tumor blocking the CVS fluid from draining and she needed to have surgery. We would be transferred to a children's hospital immediately.
 
We were also pulled aside and told not to expect to come home with our daughter. I WAS FURIOUS, how dare they say that to us. I walked away from them and said they were wrong and when we have this taken care of I will bring my daughter back to prove this! After a few hours, Lucille Packard Children's Hospital decided to take us. We were flown down to Palo Alto, CA – arriving at 2AM in the morning.
 
There my daughter was diagnosed with Medulloblastoma grade 4 brain cancer. I don’t know where we would be today if we didn't end up in Farnaz's hands. She knew I was uninsured and still went the extra mile and saved my daughter’s life. She is and will forever be an angel in our eyes. 
 
The best doctor/friend anyone could ask for – it is a honor knowing that women. God knew what he was doing when we ended up in her care. Brain tumors are hard to diagnose if we had a misdiagnosis from someone, Savannah wouldn't be here today.
 
4 years tumor free!!
 
K.L.
 

How My Daughter Was Diagnosed With Cancer

Hello, I had to share my daughter's story on how she was diagnosed with her cancerous brain tumor. My Daughter Savannah was just a day shy of ending the 3rd grade. June 8, 2010, I was at work and I got a call from the school nurse saying that my daughter's eye had crossed and she was having a hard time seeing. She also said it wasn't an emergency and Savannah would be fine to continue her day at school but to make her an eye appointment, as Savannah might need to start wearing glasses. Immediately I got on the phone and was trying to make my daughter an eye exam appointment.

The first place I called said they couldn't get her in for about a month, the second place I called said they could fit her in the next day. My daughter came home from school and said her head hurt and her eye had all of a sudden just went in towards her nose. My heart sank. Deep down I knew something wasn't right.  Savannah's eye would go straight and move on it's own. I sent Savannah to her last day of 3rd grade. I got a call shortly after dropping her off that Savannah's appointment was canceled due to double booking and they could reschedule for next week. Next week wouldn't work for me – something wasn't right.

I looked online and came across Eagle Vision and called them and they were able to get her in the same day.  It was early release day at school so I picked Savannah up from the bus stop and headed to Eagle Vision's office. I was afraid because Savannah was uninsured and I had to make sure I could afford the eye exam. The girls were very friendly and gave me a set price that I was going to pay when I left. Shortly after she got to meet Farnaz, she looked at Savannah's eyes and then dilated them and looked further. Some more tests were done and she finally asked me to go into her office and showed me what Savannah's nerves looked like behind her eye. She said something more is going on and you need to get her to the ER sooner rather then later.

I was sick with freight. I couldn't afford an ER visit. After all the tests she did on Savannah I knew I couldn't afford that either. I wish that was my only worry. Farnez somehow knew what I was thinking and told me not to worry about paying them right then, Savannah needed an MRI. I explained that we are uninsured and she wrote a prescription for an emergency MRI. Farnaz hugged Savannah and then me and said Good luck! I saw the look in her eyes that said without words this was serious.

I called my husband and told him we were on our way to the ER, Savannah needed a MRI.  He was leaving Dayton and was on his way to meet us there. I hit every red light. I couldn't talk, I was sick and weak all at once. Savannah calmly said "Am I going to die?".  Before she was able to say another word, I told her whatever happens we are in this together. What happens to her will also happen to me. I will never leave her side. I told her not to be afraid I will not let her die. I promised her that. The fear in her eyes relaxed. We finally made it to the ER. We held hands not knowing in just a few more minutes our lives were about to forever change.

My husband made it just in time for the MRI. We looked at each other scared to death. I was able to sit with Savannah during the MRI. I held her hand and prayed silently to God not to take my baby away from me. Soon after the MRI, the doctor came in and said Savannah had a very large brain tumor blocking the CVS fluid from draining and she needed to have surgery. We would be transferred to a children's hospital. We were also pulled aside and told not to expect to come home with our daughter. I WAS FURIOUS, how dare they say that to us. I walked away from them and said they were wrong and when we have this taken care I will bring my daughter back to prove this!

After hours, Lucille Packard Children's Hospital decided to take us. We were flown down to Palo Alto, Ca arriving at 2AM in the morning. There my daughter was diagnosed with Medulloblastoma grade 4 brain cancer. I don't know where we would be today if we didn't end up in Farnaz's hands. She knew I was uninsured and still went the extra mile and saved my daughter's life. She is and will forever be an angel in our eyes. The best doctor/friend anyone could ask for.  It is a honor knowing the women.  God knew what he was doing when we ended up in her care. Brain tumors are hard to diagnose. If we had a misdiagnosis from someone, Savannah wouldn't be here today. 4 years later she is tumor free!!

Kristy LaVey

Night Vision

You wake from a dream in the middle of the night, or maybe you’re looking for a light switch or door handle or phone in a dark room. We’ve all found ourselves in the dark before. You need several moments to get used to the dark and then you are able to see better. This process, ”dark adaptation,” allows our vision to see even when there’s very little light.

In order for night vision and dark adaptation to be successful, many physiological, neurological and biochemical mechanisms have to take place behind the scenes. Let’s have a look at how all this operates. Your eye features two kinds of cells: cones and rods, which are found on the retina at the back of the eye. Together they form the sensory layer that enables the eye to see colors and light. The rod and cone cells exist throughout your entire retina, except for in the small area called the fovea. The fovea has only cone cells, and its main function involves focusing on detail. What’s the functional difference between these two cell types? Basically, cones contribute to color vision, while rod cells are sensitive to light and detect movement.

So, if struggling to view something in the dark, like a dim star in the night sky, it’s better to focus on something off to the side of it. By looking to the side, you take advantage of the rods, which work better in the dark.

Another process your eye undergoes is pupil dilation. The pupil dilates to its largest diameter in about a minute; however, it takes approximately 30-45 minutes for your eyes to fully adapt. During this time, your eyes become 10,000 times more sensitive to light.

Here’s an example of dark adaptation: when you enter a darkened theatre from a well-lit lobby and have a hard time locating somewhere to sit. But after a few minutes, your eyes get used to the situation and see better. You’ll experience a very similar phenomenon when you’re looking at the stars in the sky. At the beginning, you won’t see many. Keep looking; as your eyes continue to dark adapt, millions of stars will gradually appear. Even though you need a few noticeable moments to get used to the darker conditions, you will immediately be able to re-adapt to exposure to bright light, but if you go back into the darker setting, your eyes will need time to re-adjust again.

This is why many people don’t like to drive at night. When you look right at the ”brights” of an oncoming vehicle, you are momentarily blinded, until that car is gone and your eyes readjust to the night light. To prevent this, try not to look directly at the car’s lights, and instead, try to allow peripheral vision to guide you.

There are numerous conditions that could be the cause of decreased night vision. Here are some possibilities: diet-related vitamin deficiencies, macular degeneration, cataracts, glaucoma, and others. If you notice problems with night vision, call to make an appointment with one of our eye doctors who will be able to shed some light on why this is happening.

Keeping An Eye On Poor Vision

A decline in strong vision is usually the result of a number of conditions including anatomical changes or defects in the eye, diseases affecting the eye, side effects of medication or injury. Commonly, people also suffer from visual disturbances due to aging or eye strain. Aging and stress can lead to changes in your vision, which might cause pain and even make it harder to get through normal activities, like reading the newspaper or looking at a computer screen for extended periods of time. These vision problems can be expressed through the following symptoms: blurry vision, headaches, eye strain, and struggling with short or long distances.

Blurred vision is one of the most commonly occurring signs of a vision problem. If you suffer from blurred vision when you are focusing on distant objects, you could be nearsighted, or myopic. Blurred vision that's present when you are looking at objects nearby could mean you suffer from farsightedness, or hyperopia. Blurred vision can also mean you have astigmatism which occurs because of an irregularity in the shape of the cornea. Whatever the cause of blurry vision, it's essential to have your eye care professional thoroughly check your vision and prescribe a solution to help clarify your sight.

A sudden onset of flashes of light, often combined with floating black spots and the feeling of a dark curtain or veil blocking a portion of your vision indicates you might have what's known as a retinal detachment. In this case, make an appointment to see your eye doctor promptly, because this can have serious consequences.

Another indicator of a vision problem is the inability to distinguish between shades or strength of color. This indicates a problem perceiving color, or color blindness. Interestingly, this condition is often unknown to the patient until diagnosed by testing. Color blindness is mostly found in males. If present in a female it could mean she has ocular disease, and an optometrist needs to be consulted. If you have difficulty distinguishing objects in dim light, it could mean the patient suffers from night blindness.

Cataracts, a condition frequently seen aging people have several warning signs including: unclear vision that is worse in bright light, weak night vision, trouble seeing small writing or objects, colors that appear faded or yellowed, double or triple vision in one eye only puffiness around the eye, and an opaque white look to the normally dark pupil.

Throbbing eye pain, headaches, blurred sight, redness in the eye, rainbow coronas around lights, nausea and vomiting are indicators of glaucoma, an acute medical illness, which needs immediate medical attention.

In children, it's useful to keep an eye out for weak eye movement, or eyes that cross in or out, which could indicate a vision problem called strabismus. Specific behavior in children, such as rubbing eyes frequently, squinting, or the need to shut one eye to look at things better, can often point to strabismus.

While clearly some conditions are more problematic than others, anything that limits normal vision will be something that really affects your quality of life. A brief visit to your optometrist can save you from unnecessary discomfort, not to mention further eye and vision problems.

What All Women Should Know About Safe and Healthy Eyes

It's April, which is Women's Eye Health and Safety Month.

The many stages of a woman's life can have an impact on her vision. Eye disease among women is becoming more common, particularly in middle-aged women. In fact, studies show that the majority of women over the age of 40 experience some degree of visual impairment, and risk developing conditions such as cataracts, dry eyes, glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. It's interesting to note that the chance of women developing vision impairments has grown due to the female population's growing longevity.

As a woman, an important step to take to guarantee strong vision is to make an extensive eye exam part of your regular health routine. Be sure to go have an extensive eye exam before you turn forty, and that you don't forget to follow up with the advice your eye care professional recommends. Additionally, be aware of your family medical history, as your genes are an important detail of comprehending, diagnosing and stopping eye diseases.

In addition, maintain a healthful, well-balanced diet and don't forget to include foods rich in beta carotene, zinc and omega-3 fatty acids, which all help protect against vision loss from eye disease. You can also buy vitamin C, riboflavin and vitamin A tablets, which are all strong starting points to maintaining top-notch eye care.

If you smoke, make a decision to quit, because even second-hand smoke can add to the danger of eye disease and is a known factor in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and cataracts. Ultraviolet rays, which can also lead to the development of cataracts and age-related macular degeneration, are extremely dangerous to your eyes. When outside, and not just during the summer, make sure to wear 100% UV protective sunglasses as well as a sun hat to protect your eyes from the sun.

Changes in hormone levels, such as those that occur during pregnancy or menopause, can also affect your vision. Sometimes, these shifts can even make the use of contacts less effective or slightly painful to wear. During pregnancy, you might want to shorten contact lens wearing time and adjust your prescription as needed. It's recommended to make an appointment with your optometrist at some point during your pregnancy to address any eye or vision changes you may be noticing.

There are also precautions to take to shield your eyes from household dangers, like domestic cleaners. Be sure that household chemicals, including cleaning agents, bleach and fertilizers are kept safely and properly, and are out of reach of small children. Wash your hands well after working with all chemicals and use eye protection when using strong substances. Use safety goggles when fixing things in your house, most importantly when working with wood, metal or power tools.

If used irresponsibly, cosmetics might also be a safety risk for your eyes. Particularly when it comes to eye makeup, never use anyone else's products. Avoid using old eye makeup and discard anything that's older than four months, especially anything that's aqueous. Watch for any abnormal reactions and cease use immediately if you see inflammation in or around the eyes. Be aware also that you might actually develop allergies to a product you've been buying for years. Also, be sure to avoid touching the eye when using eyeliners, shadows and mascara.

As a woman, it is important to be aware of the risks and options when it comes to caring for your eyes. And also, it can't hurt to inform the other women in your life, like your daughters and friends, about how to look after their eye health.

Eye Care on The Go

Safe driving depends largely on proper eyesight. As a matter of fact, safe driving needs several different visual abilities such as distance and near vision, side or peripheral vision, seeing in limited light and color vision, plus many others.

Distance vision is vital because of how it lets you evaluate the stretch of road in front of you and become aware of any risks that might come up. Most importantly, it gives you the opportunity to respond quickly and avoid any mishaps that could take place. On the other hand, if you don't see ahead well then there's a chance you may not see the dangers soon enough.

Distance vision is also directly related to the state of your windshield and glasses (including sunglasses), so check that both are clean and scratch-free which can inhibit your sight, mostly when it's dark or sunny.

Equally as important is peripheral vision, which enables you see either side of your vehicle, which is crucial to see pedestrians, animals and cross traffic without needing to even glance away from the road ahead. Being able to see peripherally is also important for switching lanes and making turns. Maximize use of both your side and rearview mirrors. Ensure they're angled properly, to assist your side vision.

Additionally, good depth perception is important for road safety. This allows you to measure distances accurately in busy driving conditions, switch lanes and pass other vehicles on the road. Accurate depth perception needs adequate functioning in both of your eyes. If you've lost visual acuity in one eye, it's advised to check with your eye doctor to determine if it is okay for you to drive. You may need to refrain from driving until a solution is found to correct your vision.

Accommodation also plays an important role when driving. If you're unfamiliar with the term accommodating, it is the ability to move your focus from a view far to something in front of you, such as from the distance ahead of you to the dashboard. If you've recently hit middle-age you may have a slight challenge with near vision, and it's normal to require reading glasses or another vision correction solution to see your dashboard. Speak to your optometrist to talk about the options.

Being able to see color is also pretty important while driving. Those in the driver's seat need to be able to instantly recognize traffic lights, street signs and hazard signals. For those with a color vision defect, reaction time might be a little slower than that of others. If this sounds familiar, avoid using medium or dark blue sunglasses, as these can seriously interfere with your ability to discern colors.

Try not to hold off until you renew or get your driver's license to get your eyes checked. You never want to risk your life or the lives of the others on the road! If you suspect your eyesight isn't up to par, visit your optometrist, and get a proper eye exam as soon as you can.